Tracking Revisions to a File

The Revision Control System (RCS) is a set of tools for managing multiple revisions of a single file.

To store a revision of a file so that RCS can keep track of it, you check in the file with RCS. This deposits the revision of the file in an RCS repository−−−a file that RCS uses to store all changes to that file. RCS makes a repository file with the same file name as the file you are checking in, but with a `,v' extension appended to the name. For example, checking in the file `foo.text' with RCS creates a repository file called `foo.text,v'.

Each time you want RCS to remember a revision of a file, you check in the file, and RCS writes to that file's RCS repository the differences between the file and the last revision on record in the repository. To access a revision of a file, you check out the revision from RCS. The revision is obtained from the file's repository and is written to the current directory. Although RCS is most often used with text files, you can also use it to keep track of revisions made to other
kinds of files, such as image files and sound files.

Another revision control system, Concurrent Versions System (CVS), is used for tracking collections of multiple files whose revisions are made concurrently by multiple authors. While much less simple than RCS, it is very popular for managing free software projects on the Internet. See Info file `cvs.info', node `Top', for information on using CVS.

Posted on: 16/12/2009








0 Comments
If you want to leave a comment please Login or Register
How to backup your data using rsync......
Understanding autoconf......
The Basics of fdisk......
Accessing Memory Using DMA......
The fd Directory......