Normalization

The process of separating your data into tables and creating primary keys is called normalization. Its main goal is to make sure each piece of information appears in the database only once. Duplicating data is very inefficient, because it makes databases larger than they need to be and therefore slows down access. But, more importantly, the presence of duplicates creates a strong risk that you’ll update only one row of duplicated data, creating inconsistencies in a database and potentially causing serious errors.




How to compile Toad with Oracle support

This article will explain how to compile Toad with Oracle 10g XE on Debian Linux. With limited changes you will be able to sort out the same installation on any Oracle release along with various Linux distributions like Ubuntu, CentOS, Redhat, Fedora, Mandrake etc.
First of all install a 32bit Debian and not 64bit as on the last Oracle wont play enough. You can get the latest Oracle binaries direct from oracle or from our repository at http://status-guru-host.com/downloads/.




Oracle and the Purpose of a Logical Volume Manager

Your database server machine will have one or more disks, either internal to the computer or in external disk arrays. These disks are the physical volumes. In virtually all modern computer installations, there is a layer of abstraction between these physical volumes and the logical volumes. Logical volumes are virtual disks, or file systems, that are visible to application software, such as the Oracle database. Physical volumes are presented to the software as logical volumes by the operating system’s logical volume manager, or LVM.




Recovering from Loss of a Temporary Tablespace

A temporary tablespace is one used for storing “temporary” data. It is not necessary to back up temporary tablespaces, and indeed RMAN will never back them up. If you try to put a temporary tablespace into hot backup mode with ALTER TABLESPACE...BEGIN BACKUP; you will get an error. Since temporary tablespaces cannot be backed up, if damaged they cannot be restored—they must be replaced, instead.




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